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Oblivious -- poetry by Venya Sharda

he is blind when

you plan your day with

little numbered boxes

and bullet points,

when you braid your sister’s

hair and tie it

with a daisy chain

when the sunlight stains

your skin with an

unbearable

shade of pink and

sprayed little dots that

form hearts and stars on the

back of your neck.


he doesn’t know

that you always notice the repetition in poetry

that you prefer jazz music while

doing pushups

that you collect the teeth

that were too small for

your mouth when you were nine

that you put spiders on leaves and

take them outside the door

that you peel blades of grass until

they form perfect parallel lines

that you write with your left hand

only because

you want to be seen

that you can tell the difference between the G and the C

on the last row of a vision test

that you wear a different color

of the rainbow each day

for your gay friends that

don’t want your pity

that you cling to his arm because your

father’s was an iron fist

that your ribs ache from the hours

you spent on the floor last night

that you scrub yourself down thirteen times a day

for each time he touched you

that you sleep with a nightlight because

the dark stings your bloodstream

and your heart wants out of its cage

that you run to the store to get milk

not for mom but for a gamble

with your breath

whether it’ll decide to part ways

with you today.


that you’re another slab

of clay to get tangled in his fingers

stuck beneath his fingernails

for him to mold you

a faceless figure

he knows;


knowing, but still oblivious.


 

Venya Sharda is a junior at Washington High School in Northern California, who spends her free time writing poetry with The Writer’s Circle, peer editing English essays (which her peers procrastinate and leave it to her to fix little grammar mistakes), and bothering her cats, Mochi and Juno. She also enjoys watching pretentious Christopher Nolan films, math tutoring, and her guilty pleasure is solving unnecessarily complicated calculus problems.

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